Archive for the ‘Automotive’ Category

GM's replacement PCV valve for low manifold vacuum 12572717 is also made by other companies such as BWD

GM’s replacement PCV valve for low manifold vacuum part number 12572717 is also made by other companies such as BWD

Recently I replaced my tired old Inline 6 cylinder in my 1963 C10 with a used 350 crate motor. The previous owner has put a fairly ‘large’ cam in it, and it has that aggresive ‘lopy’ idle that we all want. While it sounds great, cams like this create very low vacuum at idle, which introduce other problems.

Chances are that if you are reading this post, it is because you are having a hard time finding a PCV valve that will operate correctly with low manifold vacuum. Try using a standard PCV valve with low vacuum, and you can hear an annoying clicking or ticking noise. This is caused by the valve not fully opening as there is not enough vacuum to do so. This may create other problems as you may not be extracting all the crank case gasses building up in the engine, which the PCV was designed to do. While there are a few options out there to solve this problem, I was surprised I was never able to find a specific ‘high performance’ or aftermarket PCV valve for low manifold vacuum motors. Most people recommend getting a PCV valve from an early to mid 60’s high performance car, such as the corvette which came from the factory with low manifold vacuum.

Upon further research, I discovered that not many years ago, GM released a PCV valve … which isn’t really really a valve at all. It’s just the PCV housing, with all the guts removed and is hollow in side. The bottom side has a pin hole, much smaller than standard PCV valves. The GM part number for this PCV is 12572717, and you’ve probably seen this referenced all over the internet while doing your search. I went to my local Advanced Auto Parts store, and while they didn’t have the GM brand, they did have the exact same part made by a company called BWD, and it is part number PCV484. It cost me just under $8, and made a huge difference in my motor. Because the inlet hole is so small, it actually helped bump up my manifold vacuum, and now I feel safe that the crank case gas build up is being removed safely with out me having to worry about. It fits right into my Chevy Small Block 350 as any PCV would do.

Here are a couple more photos of this PCV valve

BWD PCV484 is a replacement for GM 12572717 and is available at Advanced Auto

BWD PCV484 is a replacement for GM 12572717 and is available at Advanced Auto

As you can see, the inside is completely hollow. The valve part of the PCV has been removed, and air flow is restricted by the pin hole inlet at the bottom

As you can see, the inside is completely hollow. The valve part of the PCV has been removed, and air flow is restricted by the pin hole inlet at the bottom

Here you can see how small the PCV inlet hole is. This restricts the air flow, helping boost your manifold vacuum, but still allowing the intake vacuum to suck up crank case gasses.

Here you can see how small the PCV inlet hole is. This restricts the air flow, helping boost your manifold vacuum, but still allowing the intake vacuum to suck up crank case gasses.

 

1998 Dodge Viper Turn Signal & Hazard Flasher Module

The OEM Chrysler Turn Signal & Hazard Flasher Module

The turn signals and hazard lights quit working on my 1998 Dodge Viper recently. Following the directions in the service manual to diagnose the problem, I discovered it was the Turn Signal / Hazard Flasher module located where the fuse box is under the steering wheel. Unfortunately, you have to pull the whole dash panel off under the steering wheel to get to this module as it is not accessible from just removing the fuse box panel cover. Thankfully it’s only about 5 or 6 screws you have to remove and the whole dash panel comes off.

I looked around for a replacement Turn Signal  / Hazard Flasher module, and all I could find were very expensive MOPAR / Chrysler replacements. The part number of the Chrysler Flasher Module is 56007098 and they range anywhere from $30 – $45 on eBay and other online sites. I figured there had to be a cheaper module available that was a reproduction brand from another company, after all I was certain this Flasher module would be used in other Chrysler & Dodge cars as well.

Sure enough after some searching by a determined employee at Advanced Auto Parts, we found a replacement module made by Novita (Part number EP27), and cost only $15.99. It is a 5 terminal, 11-15v DC flasher module. I just installed it an my turn signals are working once again on my Dodge Viper.

I purchased a World Class T5 transmission earlier this week for my 1963 Chevy C10. My other T5 had the main shaft bearings go so I decided to upgrade to a WC T5 instead of fixing the Non-WC T5. The new T5 needed the driven gear on the output shaft swapped so I could get the correct speedometer readings for my truck’s rear end gears and tire height.

After pulling the tail housing all apart, swapping the driven speedometer gear, and trying to put the tail housing back on, I was confronted with a problem that wouldn’t allow the tail housing to go all the way back on. This left about a 1/2 inch gap between the main housing of the T5 and the tail housing.

After nearly 8 hours fighting my T5 transmission tail housing, I finally figured out what was wrong. I found a thread on another site where a guy said he gave the fifth gear assembly a light smack towards the driver side of the transmission and it all popped into place.

I tried this but with no luck, and am not comfortable hitting on the transmission too hard even with a rubber mallet.

So I started playing with the shaft on the on the opposite side of 5th gear which connects to the 5th gear assembly, and discovered the shaft was pushed in towards the front of the transmission. This was causing the 5th gear assembly to lock into a funny position. I pulled back on shaft (pulling the shaft towards the rear of the transmission) and it all freed up.

Once I tried putting the tail housing back on everything went smooth!

Apparently it puts fifth gear into a weird position causing it to hit the side of the tail housing. This needs to be all freed up in order for everything to fall into place.

I hope this helps others with this problem who might find post in the future. There isn’t a lot of posts about it on the internet.Watch Full Movie Online Streaming Online and Download

You can reference my thread on the 67-72chevytrucks.com forum here:

T5 reassembly question

My new 1963 Chevy C10 is finally on the road!

  • 3.8 liter, 230 ci inline 6 cylinder original motor
  • 5 speed B&W T5 transmission (originally had the 3 speed Muncie)
  • Lowered 4 inches
  • HEI distributor
  • S2k Seats
  • Painless wiring harness, replacing the 40+ year old wiring
  • and a bunch of other little fixes to get it running perfect!

1963 Chevrolet C10

Mercedes SLK230 K40 RelayChances are if you found this page you’ve encountered the dreaded Mercedes-Benz SLK 230 K40 relay problem. For those of you that are not familiar with the K40 Relay, it basically controls throttle response, fuel management, and your fuel pump. I also read some where that it has something to do with emissions, I’m not 100% sure, but I do know how to fix it!

You’ll know if you have the K40 Relay problem by the following symptoms:

  • Your car is not running great, the throttle is not responsive
  • When you turn the car off, you smell the faint smell of gasoline
  • Your check engine light is on
  • The error codes causing your check engine light are the following: P1235, P1236, P1420, P1525 (you need a code reader to determine this)

The bad news is that if you are to take your car to the shop to have this fixed, the part alone is several hundred dollars plus the labor for them to repair it and you’ve got yourself one expensive problem. The good news though, is that this problem is relatively easy to fix if you know how to use use solder and a soldering iron.

I have successfully repaired this on my own 1999 Mercedes SLK230, and it took me under an hour to do. It’s really not that complicated. The tools you need are:

  • Phillips Screw Driver
  • Small flat head screw driver
  • Soldering Iron
  • Solder
  • Your hands and a little patience

Fortunately for you, I have step by step directions on how to repair the Mercedes SLK230 Relay problem in my photo gallery. Give it a visit and you can save yourself several hundreds dollars by doing it yourself!